Friday, 30 November 2012

Watz Buzzing - 30 Nov 2012

Singapore Faces Property Bubble Risk – PM Lee
Forexblog.oanda.com, 27 Nov 2012
Home prices climbed to a record in the third quarter, even after the government introduced six rounds of measures since the beginning of 2010 to rein in demand.
“We have had a property boom, almost a bubble,” said Lee, who previously headed the central bank, served as finance and trade minister and studied mathematics at the University of Cambridge.
“It’s because liquidity is sloshing around worldwide and real interest rates are negative,” he said. “That’s a difficult problem for us on the overall property market.” Full story

Also Read:
  1. Housing Minister Khaw remains nonchalant as public housing prices record new high in Q3
  2. Khaw Boon Wan: Singaporeans should not be upset over HDB flat sold for S$1 million - Property Guru 
  3. HDB flat prices rose to record high in Q3 
  4. HDB selling new 3-room flats in Kallang/Whampoa for $795,000?

Related:
Lee Rues Singapore as Retirement Home Without Boosting Birthrate - BusinessWeek


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No Country For Old Men



For moment, it read like Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong finally got the message. In the context of the disruption 117 bus drivers can inflict on our public transportation, anyone else would experience an epiphany of sorts.

Instead, he was was using Bloomberg's editor-in-chief Matthew Winkler to peddle his "population growth is connected to immigration and economic growth" poison. Winkler had asked if there was anything Lee would have done differently since he took charge of the Government in 2004. His answer - should have addressed the ageing population issues earlier.

Somehow he missed out on the other developments in the human race. People also get married, have kids, grandchildren, all in the natural order of things. Except when the cycle of life is disrupted by unnatural eugenic theories of social engineering that turn a nation on its head.

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Trying to kill a mosquito with a sledgehammer


Link: TRS's response to Ng Eng Hen's lawyers

Lawyer's letter to Yawning Bread, lawyer's letter to TREmeritus, lawyer's letter to radio DJ Joe Augustin, lawyer's letter to Singapore Surf, and now, lawyer's letter to The Real Singapore (TRS). This seems to be the new normal in Singapore, post GE2011.

Instead of countering alleged misinformation and inaccurate blog posts, and comments on social media by putting out accurate information and robustly defending its record with more speech, this PAP Government has chosen to suppress such opinions and remarks by threatening those that made them with lawyer's letters.

Considering the fact that this Government can make use of the mainstream media to correct any of the alleged inaccuracies, which's readership and reach are much higher than any of the blogs or individual commenters; and also the fact that most (if not all) blogs which published such information or opinion, will gladly remove that content, and publish any information the Government sends to them to clarify the inaccuracy which appeared on their blog, the practice chosen by this Government is regrettable.

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Go Sue TRS! Sue!


The Real Singapore is in trouble again, again be happy! TRS has been posting shit for some time and it is about time it gets into shit itself. Again. Shit goes around! TRS is like the old Temasek Review, plagiarise and even post fake news, which is super weak. If they wanted to attract eyeballs and eventually ad money, just go for sex and sleaze. There is no need to fake and copy news, which is just the excuse the PAP wants to focus on in labeling any news sites out there as lacking credibility and sensationalist. BTW TRS is not the only one plagiarising - Temasek Times and Occupy Singapore do it too. Hey, is there one same person behind all these sites? LOL

Meanwhile, the former loaded surgeon turned loaded PAP minister was pissed with a recent TRS article on Mindef where TRS mixed plagiarism and fake news, a TRS first, or at least the first time TRS was found out. The defence minister has sent Davinder Singh, the PAP's elite lawyer-commando-sniper to take out TRS. TRS can't hide, can run and would only die tired.

TRS was recently kind enough to say Alex Tan and Yang Kaiheng are no longer in it. At least TRS has integrity to protect the innocent. Oh? Hmmmm or more like they are nervous that their charade is up and instead trying to pretend they not involved in it anymore? Everything sounds more and more like the old Temasek Review where the doctor insisted that he was no longer involved and had sold it off to someone else which he does not know. Sure. Whatever.

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Website turned down Ng Eng Hen's lawyer request for particulars?

Hardwarezone Forum


(Click on image to enlarge)

Full story


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The Paramountcy of Opposition Unity

The question of opposition unity is an indispensable element in facing the PAP in GE2016. In the last General Election in GE2011 there was a three-cornered contest in the Punggol East SMC. Ii was a straight fight between PAP and the opposition in all the other constituencies which showed a credible unity among the opposition. In GE2016 there should not be any three-cornered contest to show complete unity among the opposition.

The possible entry of Chee Soon Juan, Secretary-General of the Singapore Democratic Party, into the fray in 2016 will be a welcome development since his bankruptcy has been annulled leaving him free to stand in elections again. That he has stressed the importance of opposition unity in the next GE in 2016 is a timely reminder to opposition parties to sink whatever differences they may have in the larger interest of the public, the electorate sympathetic to them.

It is mind-boggling if there cannot be complete unity in the opposition camp in facing the PAP in GE2016. The present prognosis of the political situation is assessed to be in favour of the opposition because of the iniquities of the PAP policies and the opposition parties should not overlook this golden opportunity to nurture this favourable development to their political advantage when GE2016 comes around.This has not escaped the attention of the PAP leadership who are working strenously  to try to salvage the unfavourable situation by introducing such novelties as the National Conversation in order to appease the Singaporeans' wrath.

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Getting all worked up

Odd that we get emotional when we’re ranked No. 1 emotion-less country. I mean, why do we even care that we don’t wear our heart on our sleeves, tear our hair out and breathe fire? We are a cool, calm and collected nation.

Underneath, we are a cauldron of burning passion. I mean, just look at the sex scandals we’re been exposed to so far

In any case, Gallup is asking all the wrong questions about whether we smiled yesterday and all that. It should be asking this:

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OPINION: A First Class Degree From Oxbridge - So What? - Julian Tan

Huffington Post UK, 12 Nov 2012
Life at university is about finding that balance between work and play. Indeed, mastering the art of doing this is a tricky and delicate affair, and very few people ever manage to do it.

But quite honestly, very few people even try. Many, like me, get so thoroughly absorbed into the work at university that it is the only thing we see and value. We score brilliantly (or die trying) in the written exams and forget that academic results are not everything.

University is a place of learning and learning takes place in all shapes and forms, often beyond the classroom. Full story
 

Related:
A Response to 'a First Class Degree From Oxbridge - So What?' - Huffington Post
 
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PG for court hearings

What is the case all about between Ng Boon Gay and Cecilia Sue? Is it a case about promiscuity or about corruption? So far the case is more about detailed sexual acts, explicit, implicit, lewd, perversion, and nearly everything there is to make an X rated movie sell. The corruption part seems to be less important and superficially treated. It is like a violent movie with all the gore and blood with little care to the plot.

I think the censorship board should be called in to snip some of the scenes from being published in the main media or people may think that it is an evening paper or some wanbao.

Should the media also be rated for certain news like PG, under 18, under 16 like in the cinemas or on TV?


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The Mother Of Gag Orders

"Minister says cannot say", was how one Nanyang pupil presented it.

It is still amazing that 51 adults have had their lives ruined, some sent to jail, others with careers hanging in limbo, and yet not a single soul has dared leak the identity of the under aged slut who caused so much pain. The school kids are not guarding anything similar, just the name of the top scorer for this year's Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE) results. It must be real stressful for a youngster to be placed with so great a responsibility. Ironically, the 48,333 Dragon Year born students who took the test aren't acting very dragonish.

The adults, especially those running the lucrative private tuition business, are taking the gag order more seriously.  The last thing they need is to be black balled by the Ministry of Education.  They probably have to whisper the information to enquiring parents on a need to know basis, they can tell you, but they will have to shoot you aftwards.

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Thursday, 29 November 2012

Why it took time to label protest a strike



FOR the first time, Acting Minister for Manpower Tan Chuan-Jin yesterday called the no-show at work by SMRT's China-born bus drivers on Monday and yesterday an "illegal strike".

On Monday, 102 mainland Chinese SMRT bus drivers staged a protest at their Woodlands dormitory over unhappiness on matters such as getting a lower pay increase than Malaysian drivers. Yesterday morning, 62 China-born SMRT bus drivers did not report for work.

The Government, various Members of Parliament and public-transport operator SMRT previously avoided labelling the incident a strike.

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Why the word 'strike' was not used initially

For the first time yesterday, the word "strike" was used to describe the actions of the SMRT bus drivers who refused to work in protest against salary increments.

The absence of the word from media reports led to questions from members of the public and others online about why it was not used.

At a press conference yesterday, Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin explained that this was because the Government needed time to ascertain the facts of the incident, as well as the rules and regulations provided under the law.

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Govt moves against 'illegal strike'

Police probing SMRT bus drivers; plans in place if strike is prolonged

THE Government is taking action against the SMRT bus drivers from China who refused to turn up for work because they were unhappy with their wages.



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Zero tolerance for bus drivers' illegal strike: Govt

The Government sharply rebuked the SMRT bus drivers who refused to return to work yesterday, a day after they had staged a similar protest, saying they had "clearly crossed the line" by staging an illegal strike.

Chastising them for "taking matters into their own hands", Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin said the Government had zero tolerance for the drivers' actions because they had disrupted an essential service and affected the daily life of the community, as well as hurt Singapore's industrial harmony.

Their illegal conduct will be investigated, he said at a press conference called yesterday evening after 88 drivers refused to take to the wheel.

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SMRT-bus drivers dispute: NTUC says it supports govt's action

NTUC has issued a statement in response to the Government's updates on the issue of the SMRT-bus drivers dispute:

The National Trades Union Congress (NTUC) supports the actions taken by the Government. It is important to send a clear signal to all workers that as a nation ruled by law, there are proper ways of dealing with issues and disagreement

Any action that is illegal must and will be dealt with firmly, regardless of whether the workers are local or foreign.

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No-show by SMRT's bus drivers an "illegal strike": Tan Chuan-Jin

A SMRT bus carrying personnels from SMRT HR and bus operations management arrive at the workers' dormitary at Woodlands Sector 1 where the SMRT drivers involved in the wage dispute were staying on 27 Nov 2012. Photo by OOI BOON KEONG.

Acting Minister for Manpower Tan Chuan-Jin said today the no-show at work by SMRT's bus drivers from China is an "illegal strike".

He said workers of essential services have to give 14 days' notice to their employers and must comply with requirements under the law.

Mr Tan said the drivers have crossed the line by taking matters into their own hands as their actions affected essential services and industrial relations.

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Singapore's first strike in 26 years peters out

Singapore's first strike in 26 years ended Wednesday when mainland Chinese bus drivers demanding higher pay reported for duty after two days of protest that angered the city-state's government.

State-linked transport operator SMRT said the rate of attendance of its bus drivers on Wednesday was "back to normal and all our bus services are running as scheduled".

It said 20 of the drivers were "assisting the police" in an investigation after their action was declared illegal by the manpower ministry, which warned that anyone found guilty could be fined or jailed for up to a year.

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Drivers back at work but saga's not over

SMRT bus drivers on the 4am first shuttle bus to work yesterday morning. Some drivers who returned to work after the strike said they did so for fear of going without a salary. Photo by DON WONG

Bus services operated by SMRT ran as scheduled yesterday as its China drivers got behind the wheel, after a two-day illegal strike over their pay and living conditions.

The dust, however, has yet to settle, as 20 of the 171 drivers involved in the illegal strike are assisting the police with their investigations into possible breaches of the law. Under the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act, essential service workers cannot go on strike unless they give their employers 14 days' notice of their intention. Contacted last night, a police spokesperson said it was unable to comment further as an investigation is ongoing and should be allowed to "run its course".

Some who returned to work yesterday said they did so for fear of going without a salary, while others took heed of the management's promise to get back to them on their demands. Six drivers who did not turn up for work yesterday morning had valid reasons for being absent, SMRT said.

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20 SMRT bus drivers assisting police in investigations

Most of the bus drivers involved in an illegal strike over a pay dispute have returned to work except for six who had valid medical reasons.

Providing an update at a media conference, transport operator SMRT said that 20 bus drivers from China and SMRT personnel are assisting the police in their investigations.

SMRT added that disciplinary action will be taken against those who didn't turn up for work and didn't have valid reasons but did not disclose what the disciplinary action would include.


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SMRT lodges a police report for an illegal strike by some of its bus drivers from China

In an update on an illegal strike by some of its bus drivers from China, SMRT says it has lodged a police report for further investigations into possible breaches of the law.

This is in accordance with its obligations as a public transport operator.

At the same time, SMRT said it's conducting its own investigations on whether terms of employment have been breached.

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Singapore Police Stand Guard as SMRT Bus Drivers Halt Work

Singapore police stood watch at a workers' dormitory as bus drivers from SMRT Corp. (MRT) skipped work for a second day after a wage dispute, in a rare public display of labor discord in the island nation.

About 60 bus drivers didn't turn up for work this morning, some with valid medical reasons, SMRT, Singapore's biggest subway operator that also runs bus services, said in an e-mailed statement. SMRT said yesterday that 102 of its drivers, all from China, didn't report for duty.

"We continue to keep our communications open with the service leaders," SMRT said, referring to the drivers. The company is "also working with the relevant authorities to find an amicable resolution," it said.

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Singapore laws on strikes


SEVERAL pieces of Singapore's legislation deal with strikes, including those that stipulate that strikes are prohibited in the public service.

Some general ones include the Trade Unions Act as well as the Trade Disputes Act.

The latter defines a strike, also called an industrial action, as "the cessation of work by a body of persons employed in any trade or industry acting in combination, or a concerted refusal...to continue to work or to accept employment".

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SMRT PRC Bus Drivers End Strike After Intervention By Chinese Embassy Officials
Hardwarezone Forum, 28 Nov 2012
The SMRT bus drivers who had been on strike for the past two days, causing delays in service, appeared to have returned to work this morning.
Two buses full of drivers picked up the drivers, who are from China, from their Woodlands dormitory to ferry them to their respective bus depots.
The drivers, who were protesting against what they viewed as an unequal pay rise compared to drivers from Malaysia, were in discussions with SMRT and union officials for most of yesterday.

Late in the day, Chinese Embassy officials arrived at the dormitory and were seen talking to the drivers before they left in the early hours of the morning.  Full story
 
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Bus driver community split over mass labour strike


Some SMRT bus drivers feel that their Chinese colleagues should rightly be earning less than their Malaysian counterparts. (Yahoo! photo)

UPDATE on Wed 28/11: All drivers who went on strike on Monday have returned to work on Wednesday morning.

While bus captains from China do work the same hours as drivers of other nationalities, it's fair that they are paid less because they get transportation and housing, say some SMRT bus drivers.

Speaking to Yahoo! Singapore on an anonymous basis on Tuesday, several Singaporean and Malaysian bus drivers in general voiced this sentiment in the wake of Monday’s full-day Chinese bus drivers’ strike.

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SMRT bus drivers appear to end strike

The SMRT bus drivers who had been on strike for the past two days, causing delays in service, appeared to have returned to work this morning.

Two buses picked up the drivers, who are from China, from their Woodlands dormitory to ferry them to their respective bus depots.

One bus left at 4am while the next departed at 5.15am, according to TODAY photojournalist Don Wong, who said that while it was impossible for the media to do an exact headcount, all seats had been occupied on both buses by their time of departure, suggesting a full complement of drive

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An illegal strike or "wage dispute"?

The PAP Government was probably caught with its pants down when 171 (originally quoted as 102) PRC bus drivers of SMRT suddenly refused en masse to turn up for work on Monday 25 November because they were unhappy with their wages.The Government demurred in calling it an  illegal strike immediately obviously because the drivers involved are from China, a country with which the PAP leaders are ingratiating themselves and a country not to be trifled with because of its greatness. The irony is that if the drivers involved were Singaporeans, the Government would not have batted an eyelid in using the knuckleduster and arresting them for illegal strike. So when the Ministry of Manpower was told about the "SMRT situation", it avoided branding it an illegal strike and merely said that it takes "the workers' actions very seriously".

The intrepid Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin probably could not find peace of mind thniking hard how to present the drivers' action as an illegal strike without repercussions, especially from China. So it was not surprising that he finally summoned up enough courage, after no doubt consultation with his political master the prime minister, to describe the drivers' action as an illegal strike. The Government said that the drivers would be dealt with, if found guilty. It is not hard to see that the Acting Minister's explanation of not calling the drivers' action at the outset as illegal strike lacks conviction.

The China factor is undoubtedly the most important consideration in the PAP Government's deliberations in how to handle this illegal strike by PRC drivers .Netizens in China are out in full force accusing the Singapore Government of discriminating against PRC workers. And China has asked Singapore to safeguard the rights and interests of  Chinese workers according to local laws. The Chinese mainstream media are probably holding back comments waiting for a cue from the Chinese Government. So that should be sufficient premonition for the PAP Government to take note on how to deal with the PRC drivers without incurring the wrath of Great China.

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Time for govt to show leadership, or admit its incompetence



We have the government exhorting Singaporeans not to be xenophobic, but on the other hand, we have a GLC practicing wage discrimination along nationalistic lines in the most blatant fashion. This is sheer hypocrisy.

As it is, bus drivers employed in Singapore already rank lowest among developed countries in terms of pay. Hence, this episode illustrates perfectly well that the huge influx of foreigners is all about giving corporations and GLCs a gold mine of cheap labour at the expense of the livelihoods of Singaporeans.

The impotent National Trade Union Congress (NTUC) also added nothing of substance, apart from rehashing motherhood statements about the need for proper ways of dealing with disagreements or the need to maintain an open line of communication with workers, especially those who are not union members.

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Strike Two
 


 It's official. For the second day running, the strike is on. After SMRT's packet of lies (the strikers on Monday numbered 171, not 102), 88 drivers from China stood their ground for their right of protest.

While the ex-army officer (Desmond Kuek was the 6th Chief of Defence Force of the Singapore Armed Forces) they hired to run SMRT is taking cover in his bunker, another ex-general tried to explain why it took him so long to understand the meaning of the word "strike".  He probably had to ask permission from the boss first. "Sir! Permission to think, Sir!"

Brigadier General and Acting Minister of Manpower Tan Chuan-Jin said it took a whole day for the Government to call the protest a strike because,

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We Pay $1.1 Billion To Get A Bus Strike?

I was aghast when parliament approved the $1.1 billion (Bus Service Enhancement Programme) of taxpayers money to be given the bus companies to improve bus services.

We cannot help the poorest of the poor in Singapore by providing them with 3 meals in hawkers centre (No, not in food court , definitely not in hotel restaurant!); we cannot have minimum wage for the lowest paid; we cannot buy flats from HDB at affordable price (no, not subsidised but reasonable price at cost plus basis) BUT we can blow $1.1 billion to add comfort to the two public transport operators.

Now I am devastated!
Red vs Red
Men In Red
Vehicles in Red
Do the 'Ang Chia's (Special Operations Command vehicles) still intimidate? Or are they merely 'toys' to PRCs because PRCs did messed around with tanks in Tiananmen Square previously?

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Realtime Coverage



Why the word 'strike' was not used initially
Business Times (subscription)
TODAYonline - ‎3 hours ago‎
TODAYonline - ‎3 hours ago‎
Business Times (subscription) - ‎12 hours ago‎
Business Times (subscription) - ‎12 hours ago‎
Bernama - ‎12 hours ago‎
Bernama - ‎12 hours ago‎
Why it took time to label protest a strike
AsiaOne - ‎34 minutes ago‎
FOR the first time, Acting Minister for Manpower Tan Chuan-Jin yesterday called the no-show at work by SMRT's China-born bus drivers on Monday and yesterday an "illegal strike". On Monday, 102 mainland Chinese SMRT bus drivers staged a protest at ...
Zero tolerance for bus drivers' illegal strike: Govt
TODAYonline - ‎3 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE - The Government sharply rebuked the SMRT bus drivers who refused to return to work yesterday, a day after they had staged a similar protest, saying they had "clearly crossed the line" by staging an illegal strike. Chastising them for "taking ...
Why the word 'strike' was not used initially
TODAYonline - ‎3 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE - For the first time yesterday, the word "strike" was used to describe the actions of the SMRT bus drivers who refused to work in protest against salary increments. The absence of the word from media reports led to questions from members of the ...
No show by SMRT drivers an illegal strike: Tan Chuan-Jin
Business Times (subscription) - ‎12 hours ago‎
Acting Minister for Manpower Tan Chuan-Jin has called the actions of a group of SMRT bus drivers that refused to show up for work an illegal strike. - PHOTO: ST. Acting Minister for Manpower Tan Chuan-Jin has called the actions of a group of SMRT bus ...
Strikes By SMRT Drivers Illegal, Zero Tolerance For Unlawful Action, Says Acting ...
Bernama - ‎12 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE, Nov 27 (Bernama) -- Strikes are illegal for workers in essential services, unless they give the employer 14 days' notice of an intent to go on strike, and comply with requirements of the notice, said Acting Minister for Manpower Tan Chuan-Jin.
No-show by SMRT's bus drivers an "illegal strike": Tan Chuan-Jin
TODAYonline - ‎14 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE - Acting Minister for Manpower Tan Chuan-Jin said today the no-show at work by SMRT's bus drivers from China is an "illegal strike". He said workers of essential services have to give 14 days' notice to their employers and must comply with ...

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related:
Arrests, Abuses And Alleged Assaults
Lessons to learn from the illegal SMRT strike

Wednesday, 28 November 2012

Wage dispute? Protest? Or strike?

Did the PRC drivers really went on strike?



This is our ST tactic of calling the industrial action by PRC bus drivers working for SMRT a strike without being responsible for saying so after inviting the ire of readers.

Strike is such a taboo word. Everyone is afraid of what it might invite to their careers and business if they would be brave enough to call this a strike. Even the foreign media was extremely careful. Netizens and bloggers couldn't care less. Just as in days of a bygone era, Chinese on the streets made fun of high ranking mandarins calling a spade a spade. Junior mandarins and the well connected kept a low profile and distance themselves. Emperors were protected only because you could lose your head for telling as it was.

That's life. Only the kid thought nothing wrong of telling the emperor he had no clothes! What ST had done is to give us a picture of what a nude person looks like and let us judge if we are seeing a naked fellow for ourselves. 

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No-show by SMRT bus drivers a strike or protest?


Bus drivers involved in wage dispute leaving their Woodlands dormitory. (PHOTO/TODAY)

102 SMRT bus drivers, all China nationals, refused to turn up for work on Monday over pay dispute, and on Tuesday morning, over half of those involved did not show up for work again.

There's been a lot of talk about why the media and even the Manpower Ministry and SMRT have not been calling the wage protest a strike.

Instead, terms like "sit-in", "sit-out", "protest", "did not show up for work" were used.


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Singapore bus firm hit by second day of strike action - BBC News
BBC News, 27 Nov 2012
Singapore bus and underground railway company SMRT has said that strike action taken by some of its bus drivers over wages has gone into a second day.
The company said that some 60 drivers, all of whom were recruited from China, failed to turn up for work on Tuesday.
This follows similar action on Monday, when the company said that more than 100 drivers failed to turn up for work. Industrial action does not happen very often in Singapore, and the last major strike took place in 1986. Full story

Related:
  1. Defiant Chinese drivers continue pay protest in Singapore - Free Malaysia Today
  2. Some of no-show bus drivers still not back to work in Singapore - People's Daily Online
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SMRT's PRC Bus Drivers Strike Draws International Media's Attention


  1. Chinese bus drivers in Singapore in rare labor protest - CNBC.com
  2. Chinese bus drivers in Singapore in rare labor protest - Reuters
  3. Above 100 Bus Drivers Refuse to Go to Work in Singapore - CRIEnglish.com
  4. Chinese bus drivers in Singapore in rare labor protest - The Baltimore Sun 
  5. Chinese bus drivers strike in Singapore in rare labor protest - MSN News 
  6. No-show bus drivers agree to return to work in Singapore - Xinhua 
  7. 200 bus drivers refuse to work - Malaysia Star 
  8. Chinese bus drivers in Singapore in rare labour protest - The Malaysian Insider
SMRT bus drivers speak out


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Singapore Police Stand Guard as SMRT Bus Drivers Refuse to Work

Singapore police stood watch at a workers’ dormitory as bus drivers from SMRT Corp. (MRT) skipped work for a second day after a wage dispute, in a rare public display of industrial discord in the island nation.

About 60 bus drivers didn’t turn up for work this morning, some with valid medical reasons, SMRT, Singapore’s biggest subway operator that also runs bus services, said in an e-mailed statement. SMRT said yesterday that 102 of its drivers, all from China, didn’t report for duty.

“We continue to keep our communications open with the service leaders,” SMRT said, referring to the drivers. The company is “also working with the relevant authorities to find an amicable resolution,” it said.

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Chinese bus drivers in Singapore in rare labor protest

At least 100 Chinese bus drivers in Singapore refused to go to work on Monday to protest against changes to their employment terms, media said, in a rare show of defiance in a city-state where industrial action is almost unheard of.

The drivers, employed by public transport operator SMRT Corp, were unhappy about having to switch to a six-day work-week with higher pay from a five-day week. The change meant less opportunity to earn overtime pay, the Chinese-language Lianhe Zaobao newspaper reported on its website.

Pictures published by Shin Min Daily News, another Chinese-language paper, showed drivers gathered on the grounds of a dormitory where they live, with policemen and vehicles belonging to riot police around the premises.

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Above 100 Bus Drivers Refuse to Go to Work in Singapore

More than 100 Chinese bus drivers working in Singapore took medical leave and refused to go to work on Monday over differences in a recent pay rise.

The online edition of local newpapers said the bus drivers employed by local public transport operator SMRT were unhappy that the Malaysian drivers received a pay increase of 275 Singapore dollars (225 U.S. dollars) with one month bonus pay, while the Chinese drivers got an increase of 75 Singapore dollars without any bonus.

One of the drivers said a change from five work days to six also means they earn less in wages for over-time work. They also complained about the poor conditions at their dormitory and deductions from their wages for medical leaves

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Chinese bus drivers in Singapore in rare labour protest

At least 100 Chinese bus drivers in Singapore refused to go to work today to protest against changes to their employment terms, media said, in a rare show of defiance in a city-state where industrial action is almost unheard of

The drivers, employed by public transport operator SMRT Corp, were unhappy about having to switch to a six-day work-week with higher pay from a five-day week. The change meant less opportunity to earn overtime pay, the Chinese-language Lianhe Zaobao newspaper reported on its website.

Pictures published by Shin Min Daily News, another Chinese-language paper, showed drivers gathered on the grounds of a dormitory where they live, with policemen and vehicles belonging to riot police around the premises

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Report says 60 SMRT PRC bus drivers did not show up for work this morning

Hardwarezone Forum, 27 Nov 2012



Link

Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act (Singapore)

Part III prohibits strikes and lock-outs in the electricity, gas and water service industries. It also renders illegal such actions taken in respect of other essential services unless 14 days' notice has been given, or during the course of proceedings taken to resolve trade disputes. [Link]

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Over 100 SMRT's PRC bus drivers went on strike on Monday morning over wage dispute, riot police called in


Yahoo! News Singapore, 26 Nov 2012

Over 100 SMRT bus drivers from China went on a full-day strike on Monday, protesting a disparity in salary between them and other foreign bus captains.

According to SMRT, 102 bus captains failed to turn up for work. Drivers staying at dormitories in Woodlands were joined by roughly 50 to 60 others housed at dormitories in Serangoon from as early as before 8am, assembling in an open area outside before SMRT staff arrived to negotiate with them.

Police deployed several crowd control vehicles to the area throughout the day as well, with four special operations command vehicles spotted leaving the area at about 5:30pm. Full story

Also read:
  1. NTUC plays SMRT drivers out by accepting unfavourable proposal from transport company
  2. Bus Service Drivers Blow the Whistle On SMRT
  3. Disappointed with Ong Ye Kung's inaction, SMRT bus drivers petition directly to Lim Swee Say to get back 5-day work week
  4. SMRT "pay rise" exposes Ong Ye Kung (SMRT Board Director cum NTUC Director) hypocrisy 
  5. OPINION: Strike by PRC bus drivers illegal - will govt take punitive action? - Where Bears Roam Free 
  6. SMRT's PRC Bus Drivers Strike Draws International Media's Attention 
  7. SMRT's chinese bus drivers air their grievances online before going on strike - TR Emeritus 
  8. VIDEO: SMRT's Striking PRC Bus Drivers Express Their Unhappiness To Reporters About Singaporeans Getting Higher Pay Than Them
In 1980 the Singapore Airlines Pilots' Association called for a members' work-to-rule action and, in doing so, disrupted the schedules of several Singapore Airlines' (SIA) flights. Lee Kuan Yew personally confronted the pilots.

Related:
  1. PRC bus drivers on strike! - mrbrown.com
  2. Breaking: 200 SMRT PRC bus drivers went on strike! - TR Emeritus 
  3. Above 100 Bus Drivers Refuse to Go to Work in Singapore - CRIEnglish.com 
  4. SMRT launched massive recruitment drive for PRC bus drivers in China - TR Emeritus 
  5. About 100 SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work - inSing.com
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SMRT: ‘We are not looking at arresting people’


Some 60 SMRT bus drivers didn’t show up for work this morning and stayed in their dormitory. They were part of the 102 bus drivers who were involved in a protest regarding pay-related matters yesterday.

The drivers, who are from China, were urged yesterday to return to work. Read report: About 100 SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work

Police were present at the dormitory this morning

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SMRT wage protest sees no show by 60 drivers

SMRT confirms that 60 of the 102 drivers involved in a wage protest yesterday did not show up for work today.

A statement from SMRT says that some 60 drivers "did not turn up for work in the morning, some of whom have valid medical reasons".

SMRT adds that some bus services may have been affected this morning as a result, and it has activated other drivers to assist.

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SMRT's chinese bus drivers air their grievances online before going on strike

TR Emeritus, 26 Nov 2012
It has been reported by netizens that the SMRT PRC bus drivers had actually published their grievances online earlier, late yesterday night (25 Nov) at about 11pm before they went on strike this morning (26 Nov). That is, they “refused to start work” this morning.

The title of the posting uses a provocative heading, “PRC bus drivers have awakened”. It was supposed to be originally posted on Baidu website but was deleted. It was then posted on a popular PRC website in Singapore, Sgchinese...Full story


VIDEO: SMRT's Striking PRC Bus Drivers Express To Reporters Their Unhappiness About Singaporeans Getting Higher Pay Than Them



SMRT bus drivers publish their grievances online before they go on strike

t has been reported by netizens that the SMRT PRC bus drivers had actually published their grievances online earlier, late yesterday night (25 Nov) at about 11pm before they went on strike this morning (26 Nov). That is, they “refused to start work” this morning.

The title of the posting uses a provocative heading, “PRC bus drivers have awakened”. It was supposed to be originally posted on Baidu website but was deleted. It was then posted on a popular PRC website in Singapore, Sgchinese:
http://bbs.sgchinese.net/thread-6091945-1-1.html


Translation (provided by http://repolitlebijou.blogspot.sg):

SMRT has a total of about 400 Bus Drivers coming from China which is about 1/3 of their total staff strength for Bus Drivers.

For many years, excluding the 13th month bonus which you are only entitled to after working for a min. of 12 months, China Staff salary have been a lot lower than staff from other countries. The last increment of $50 SGD was still considered reasonable but at the same time, the company also increased the workload of the bus drivers by multiple fold. Everyday, the buses have to be inspected in perfect condition and it seems that instead of a pay increment, they are using the extra $50 as an excuse to increase workload that is worth a lot more than the $50 SGD. This is exactly like the behaviour of a boss for a small store and not of a big company/organization.


Will Govt take action against the illegal strike by PRC bus drivers?

SMRT drivers on strike. Big news, huh? Not really, it was coming our way all along. A break point would be hit sometime.
This is something we have not seen in many years. The last strike was sanctioned by the govt through PAP’s proxy, NTUC. The last time we had unsanctioned strikes on a regular basis was in the 1950s. Again, it was staged by the bus companies’ workers.
200 SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work over pay issue

About 200 SMRT bus drivers refused to go to work early Monday morning and instead assembled at their dormitory in Woodlands. — PHOTO: SHIN MIN
About 200 SMRT bus drivers refused to go to work early Monday morning and instead assembled at their dormitory in Woodlands.
The drivers, who are Chinese nationals, were unhappy about the recent pay increase that Malaysian drivers had received, reported Chinese newspaper Shin Min Daily News.
Malaysian drivers got a $275 increment and a month’s bonus, while Chinese nationals were paid $75 extra without any bonus.
An SMRT human resource executive was called in to resolve the dispute but when the discussion came to a standstill, police with their riot vans were called.
The strike staged by the PRC nationals is illegal. Here is the statute regulating strikes. TRADE DISPUTES ACT (CHAPTER 331)

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Mainstream media avoid the word ’strike’



With regard to the industrial action carried out by the SMRT PRC bus drivers today (‘Breaking: 200 SMRT PRC bus drivers went on strike!‘, 26 Nov), the mainstream media have also published their reports. However, they have avoided using the term ‘on strike’ in their articles.

Chinese mainstream paper, Zaobao, reported that hundreds of SMRT PRC bus drivers refused to start work:
SMRT百多中国籍司机今早拒开工
(联合早报网讯)联合早报记者魏瑜嶙报道,不满工资和住宿条件,百多名中国籍的SMRT巴士车长集体请病假,今早拒绝开工。
据一名受访车长透露,今天“请病假”的主要是来自克兰芝和兀兰车厂的车长。后来,一些宏茂桥车厂的司机也临时决定加入,目前无法确定全部有多少人。
他们聚集在兀兰员工宿舍,SMRT人员还在同他们协商。但据记者观察,现场并没有出现混乱的情况。
来自江苏王姓车长(36岁)告诉记者, 中国籍车长的基本薪水本来就比新加坡和马来西亚籍司机低,加上自从五天制改成六天制后,他们几乎没有什么加班的机会。以前一个月包括加班可赚2000多 元,现在只有1400元左右。他们也对宿舍环境差和请病假必须扣薪水的做法表示不满。
(联合早报网讯)联合早报记者魏瑜嶙报道,不满工资和住宿条件,百多名中国籍的SMRT巴士车长集体请病假,今早拒绝开工。
Translation (provided by http://repolitlebijou.blogspot.sg):
Unsatisfied with their salary and living conditions of their accomodation, 100 + SMRT Bus Captains who originated from China applied for Sick Leave and refused to start work today.
According to one of the Bus Captains, the people who applied for Sick Leave today are mainly from Kranji and Woodlands bus routes but later on, some of the bus captains from the Ang Mo Kio bus route also decided to join in. Right now, they are unable to determine how many people are involved in this “strike”.
The Bus Captains are now gathering in their Woodlands Staff Quarters and SMRT people are currently engaged in discussions with them. There is no disorder or unruly behaviour for now as observed by the reporter.
A bus captain from Jiangsu Province (36 years of age) revealed to the reporter that originally, the Bus Captains from China already have lower pay than those from Singapore and Malaysia. Furthermore, after their official working days were changed to 6 working days instead of 5, they now have even lesser chance to earn Overtime (“OT”) pay. In the past, they could still manage to earn 2000 over Singapore dollars but now only around 1400 Singapore dollars. The living conditions are also bad and if they do apply for Sick Leave, their salary will be docked. These are also part of the main reasons why they are unhappy with the SMRT Management besides the salary issue.
The Straits Times reported with this heading, ‘200 SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work over pay issue’. Again, there is no mention of the word ’strike’ in their report, only that the bus drivers “refuse” to go to work over pay issue:

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SMRT statement on mainland Chinese bus drivers' protest


A group of bus drivers seen leaving their Woodlands dormitory on the evening of Nov 26, 2012. SMRT released a statement apologising to commuters and the public on Nov 26, 2012. -- ST PHOTO: RAJ NADARAJAN

Transport operator SMRT has just released this statement on the mainland Chinese bus drivers who did not turn up for work this morning:

"This morning, 102 of our Service Leaders (SLs) for our buses who were recruited from China (PRC) did not show up for work. As a result of their absence, a number of our bus services were affected. We apologise to commuters and the public who were inconvenienced by the affected bus services.

In recent salary adjustments for our SLs, SMRT gave salary increment to all SLs who joined the company before July 2012. These 102 PRC SLs were not happy with their increment. We regret that they chose to express their unhappiness about their salaries in this manner, especially when our lines of communication with them are always open.

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PRC bus drivers on strike!


[Photo via SPH]

Wah, 200 PRC SMRT bus drivers went on strike and the riot police were called in. Mainstream media seems slow in reporting this leh. I so far only see TODAY reporting it. Maybe they must double confirm first. Maybe it is not a "strike" but an "unhappy gathering".

Oh wait! Straits Times just reported it! Their headline is "200 SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work over pay issue".
Cannot use the word "strike" issit? Must use "refuse to go to work over pay issue" ah? Hahahaha!

CNA's headline is: "SMRT bus drivers who refused to go to work in talks with management". In other news, the RSAF is rumoured to be renaming their F15 fighter jet to F15 "Refuse to go to work over pay issue" Eagle.


Maybe the foreign drivers nair watch this video of LKY when he dealt with the 1980 Singapore Airlines Pilots' Association work-to-rule action and kicked everybody's ass.

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PRC bus drivers strike: Get to the heart of the matter

On Monday morning, slightly over 100 PRC bus drivers went on strike. They were dissatisfied over recent pay increases that benefited other bus drivers more.

According to Shin Min Daily News, Malaysian bus drivers received a $275 increment and a month’s bonus, while Chinese nationals received only a $75 increment without any bonus.

A report from LianHe ReBao (联合早报) also said that the PRC drivers were unhappy over the lack of overtime pay, as well as poor living conditions at the hostel.

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Non-unionisation of PRC drivers betrays NTUC's aversion towards foreigners

 
 The National Transport Workers' Union (NTWU) has issued a press statement on the SMRT bus drivers' dispute. The union said that it does not have the legal mandate to represent the PRC bus workers of SMRT as they are not union members.

Yes, the big hypocritical talk by our PAPpy leaders about integration of foreigners in our land, goading Sinkies to accept them is all one big fat bull. When it comes to their own organisations, they run far far away from the issue!

Yesterday's strike staged by SMRT drivers, who make up of mainland Chinese, was an eye-opener in more ways than one. In my opinion, the biggest eye-opener is the hypocritical attitude the govt has towards foreigners themselves.

NTWU says it can't act for SMRT's bus workers from PRC

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First Strike


Lessons imported from China: Protest 101

First, the latest details available on the development. The industrial action began at the crack of dawn when 103 disgruntled SMRT bus drivers congregated illegally at their Woodlands Depot dormitory on Monday at 4 am. Lest we forget, the amended Singapore law determines that one lone standing person can constitute an illegal assembly. They steadfastly refused to board the buses provided by their employer to ferry them to their contractual work obligations. Instead of being arrested for their audacious affront to authority they were merely "given until noon by SMRT to return to work". Another 60 SMRT workers from the Serangoon dormitory arrived to join the picket, which could explain the earlier report of 200 belligerent Chinese nationals on site. The "talks" ended at 6 pm, with no agreement reached. Zorro, with or without mask or cape, was nowhere in sight.

"We're not comparing our salaries with the Singaporeans. We just wanted to be treated fairly like all the other foreigners," was the quote attributed to one of the strikers. One PRC national from Jiangsu Province told Chinese media Zaobao that the bus captains from China are paid less than those from Singapore and Malaysia.

The Straits Times initially reported the story with the heading, "200 SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work over pay issue". The English word for that descriptive is strike, defined in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary and Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press as "when workers refuse to continue working because of an argument with an employer about working conditions, pay levels or job losses". The Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English explains: if a group of workers strike, they stop working as a protest against something relating to their work, for example how much they are paid, bad working conditions.

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PRC bus drivers acknowledge citizenship has privileges

The one day strike by the PRC drivers for SMRT buses caused a stir like a storm in a tea cup. It was greeted with cheers when it was announced. It was something that no one thought would happen in this peaceful and richest island in the world. It was more entertaining than anything else and with SMRT involved, gave it a more hilarious twist.

What was the issue for the strike. According to reports, the PRC drivers were unhappy that they were doing the same jobs as Malaysian drivers but were paid less. If this is factually correct, then management would have to answer for it. A word of caution, in such a situation, one must compare apple with apple. Is the nature of work similar? Are seniority and performance factors included? Are the PRC drivers being provided with free or subsidized accommodation that the Malaysian drivers were not? One has to take into account the whole compensation package and other relevant factors into consideration before making a judgement.

One interesting point raised by the PRC drivers is that they don’t mind being paid less than Sinkies, an acknowledgement that this is Sinkie country. And this point is relevant. Citizenship has its advantages. Otherwise might as well throw the piece of paper into the dustbin or flush it down the loo.

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Alternative names for a Singapore bus drivers' strike



Since the mainstream media seems very reluctant to call a strike a strike, I asked my Twitter followers for alternative names to call a #busstrike:

1. @mrbrown: Alternative names for SMRT #busstrike: Mass MC.
2. @mrbrown: Alternative names for SMRT #busstrike: Unhappy Gathering.
3. @mrbrown: Alternative names for SMRT #busstrike: Co-ordinated Smoke Break.

You know what SMRT can do to fix this bus strike? Cable ties.

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SMRT's bus drivers say they are unhappy with salary and living conditions

Salary and cramped living conditions - SMRT's bus drivers from mainland China who didn't turn up for work on Monday told The Straits Times that these are their main grouses.

Early on Monday, 102 of them - and not about 200 as earlier reported - didn't turn up for work.

Some drivers living in a dormitory in Serangoon joined others at a Woodlands dormitory to express their unhappiness.

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SMRT bus drivers protest against pay


About 200 SMRT bus drivers refused to go to work early Monday morning and instead assembled at their dormitory in Woodlands. -- PHOTO: SHIN MIN

More than 100 SMRT bus drivers refused to go to work early Monday morning and instead assembled at their dormitory in Woodlands.

The drivers, who are Chinese nationals, were unhappy about the recent pay increase that Malaysian drivers had received, reported Chinese newspaper Shin Min Daily News.
Malaysian drivers got a $275 increment and a month's bonus, while Chinese nationals were paid $75 extra without any bonus.

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About 100 SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work

 

About 100 bus drivers from China and their leaders refused to go to work this morning because they were reportedly unhappy over pay-related matters.

A spokesperson from SMRT, which runs a quarter of the bus fleet in Singapore, told inSing News that the number of workers were 102, not 200 as reported by a Chinese daily earlier. The company’s management is now in talks with them over the issue.

The drivers have not left their dormitory and SMRT personnel were there to attend to the situation. The police and riot vehicles were also deployed to the site in Woodlands.

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SMRT bus drivers who refused to go to work in talks with management

SMRT bus drivers who refused to go to work in talks with management. Police are present for law and order and are not involved in negotiations. (PHOTO/TODAY)
SMRT bus drivers who refused to go to work in talks with management. Police are present for law and order and are not involved in negotiations. (PHOTO/TODAY)

Public transport provider SMRT said that it is in talks with its bus drivers who refused to go to work on Monday.

A spokesman for SMRT said the 102 bus drivers involved were from China and their service leaders are currently in talks with SMRT management.

SMRT said earlier reports that nearly 200 bus drivers were involved were incorrect.

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National Transport Workers' Union responds to SMRT bus drivers dispute

MRT Bus and MRT. Public transport. Transportation. Photo by OOI BOON KEONG. BK291106.

The National Transport Workers' Union (NTWU) have issued the following statement in response to today's SMRT bus drivers' dispute:

The National Transport Workers' Union (NTWU) does not have the legal mandate to represent the PRC bus workers of SMRT as they are not union members. We urge these workers to return to work immediately as public transport is an essential service for the members of the public.

They should approach the Ministry of Manpower or Migrant Workers Centre for assistance. We also urge the workers and management to work together to resolve their disagreement.

NTWU is prepared to help in the discussions, if the two parties welcome the involvement of the union. We hope matters can be resolved as soon as possible so as to minimize impact on commuters and other SMRT workers who have to put in extra hours to cover the duties of those who do not show up for work.

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Full coverage
SMRT wage protest sees no show by 60 drivers
TODAYonline - ‎31 minutes ago‎
SINGAPORE - SMRT confirms that 60 of the 102 drivers involved in a wage protest yesterday did not show up for work today. A statement from SMRT says that some 60 drivers "did not turn up for work in the morning, some of whom have valid medical ...
Singapore Police Stand Guard as SMRT Bus Drivers Refuse to Work
Businessweek - ‎37 minutes ago‎
Singapore police stood watch at a workers' dormitory as bus drivers from SMRT Corp. (MRT) skipped work for a second day after a wage dispute, in a rare public display of industrial discord in the island nation. About 60 bus drivers didn't turn up for work this ...
No-show by 60 SMRT bus drivers
Straits Times - ‎1 hour ago‎
THE industrial dispute between public transport operator SMRT and its China-sourced bus drivers took a new turn Tuesday (nov27) when 60 of them continued to stay away from work. SMRT confirmed that 60 drivers did not show up for work, "some of whom ...
Not all SMRT bus drivers back at work
Straits Times - ‎2 hours ago‎
Some of the China-born bus drivers seen talking just outside the dormitory security turnstile at Woodlands Dormitory at Woodlands Sector 1 on Nov 26, 2012. Not all the mainland Chinese bus drivers who staged a protest on Monday seem to have returned to ...
SMRT bus drivers stage wage protest
AsiaOne - ‎3 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE - Unhappy over the recent pay increase given to their Malaysian counterparts, 102 mainland Chinese SMRT bus drivers staged a sit-in yesterday morning. They gathered beneath their dormitory in Woodlands and refused to go to work. Chinese ...
About 100 SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work
inSing.com News - ‎2 hours ago‎
About 100 bus drivers from China and their leaders refused to go to work this morning because they were reportedly unhappy over pay-related matters. A spokesperson from SMRT, which runs a quarter of the bus fleet in Singapore, told inSing News that the ...
200 bus drivers refuse to work
The Star Online - ‎4 hours ago‎
ABOUT 200 SMRT bus drivers refused to go to work and instead assembled at their dormitory in Woodlands. The drivers, who are Chinese nationals, were unhappy about the recent pay increase that Malaysian drivers had received, reported Chinese ...
SMRT bus drivers say they are unhappy with pay, living conditions
Straits Times - ‎6 hours ago‎
The Woodlands dormitory where the bus drivers live. Salary and cramped living conditions are the main grouses of SMRT's bus drivers from mainland China who didn't turn up for work on Monday. -- ST PHOTO: RAJ NADARAJAN. By Royston Sim. Salary and ...
Photo gallery: SMRT bus drivers refuse to go to work over pay issue
Straits Times - ‎7 hours ago‎
About 200 SMRT bus drivers refused to go to work early Monday morning and instead assembled at their dormitory in Woodlands. -- PHOTO: SHIN MIN. About 200 SMRT bus drivers refused to go to work early Monday morning and instead assembled at their ...
Bus drivers refuse to take wheel in protest
TODAYonline - ‎7 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE - In the first incident of its kind in over two decades, 102 SMRT bus drivers yesterday staged an industrial action by refusing to get behind the wheel, disrupting commutes for some and forcing other employees of the company to do extra duty.
Chinese bus drivers stage work stoppage in Singapore
Bangkok Post - ‎13 hours ago‎
More than 100 mainland Chinese bus drivers in Singapore refused to work on Monday in a rare case of labour mass action in the city-state. Policemen stand by the entrance to a foreign workers' dormitory in Singapore on November 26. More than 100 ...
NTWU says it can't act for SMRT's bus workers from China
AsiaOne - ‎13 hours ago‎
"The National Transport Workers' Union (NTWU) does not have the legal mandate to represent the People's Republic of China bus workers of SMRT as they are not union members. RELATED STORIES. SMRT's bus drivers say they are unhappy with salary ...
Chinese bus drivers in Singapore refuse to go to work
AsiaOne - ‎13 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE - At least 100 Chinese bus drivers in Singapore refused to go to work on Monday to protest against changes to their employment terms, media said. The drivers, employed by public transport operator SMRT Corp, were unhappy about having to ...
SMRT respond to bus drivers' dispute
TODAYonline - ‎14 hours ago‎
This morning, 102 of our Service Leaders (SLs) for our buses who were recruited from China (PRC) did not show up for work. As a result of their absence, a number of our bus services were affected. We apologise to commuters and the public who were ...
SMRT concludes talks with no-show bus drivers
Channel News Asia - ‎17 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE: Talks between SMRT management and its 102 bus drivers who refused to report for work on Monday have concluded. According to workers Channel NewsAsia spoke to, SMRT management has indicated that the company will come back with a ...
SMRT bus drivers who refused to go to work in talks with management
TODAYonline - ‎18 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE - Public transport provider SMRT said that it is in talks with its bus drivers who refused to go to work today. A spokesman for SMRT said 102 of the bus drivers involved were from China and their service leaders are currently in talks with SMRT ...
No-show bus drivers agree to return to work in Singapore
Nzweek - ‎15 hours ago‎
SINGAPORE, Nov. 26 — About 100 Chinese bus drivers working in Singapore agreed to return to work Monday after their employer said it would consider their demand for an equal pay rise with other foreign drivers. The 102 Chinese bus drivers working with ...
Above 100 Bus Drivers Refuse to Go to Work in Singapore
CRIENGLISH.com - ‎17 hours ago‎
More than 100 Chinese bus drivers working in Singapore took medical leave and refused to go to work on Monday over differences in a recent pay rise. The online edition of local newpapers said the bus drivers employed by local public transport operator ...
Idiotic of Singapore MRT to only add station name announcements in Chinese ...
The Malaysian Insider - ‎Nov 25, 2012‎
NOV 26 — Recently, Singapore MRT started making English and Chinese announcements on the trains. Before every station, English and Chinese (Mandarin) announcements are made. Other announcements like no eating on the trains, security alert, etc are ...

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related:
Arrests, Abuses And Alleged Assaults
Lessons to learn from the illegal SMRT strike